Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce

If you haven’t noticed already, I’m a big fan of pasta. Whether it be Simple Spaghetti with Peas, Caprese Pasta Salad with Asparagus Pesto or Lemon Ricotta Pasta, I am here for it. Not only does the pasta itself bring me joy, but the sauce in which it’s drenched in is also something to obsess over. I especially enjoy a creamy, velvety sauce that has dynamite flavor and texture. And that’s where this cauliflower Alfredo sauce comes into play. It may sound a little weird, but trust me on this one – you’re simply not going to believe how luscious and tasty it is.

Cauliflower alfredo sauce in white pot

How to make cauliflower alfredo sauce

It all starts with whirling cauliflower, milk, stock, lemon and spices together in a blender (no roux required!).

First, you’ll need a few cups of cooked cauliflower. You can use fresh cauliflower that’s been steamed, boiled or roasted; or, you can pop a bag of frozen cauliflower into the microwave, then transfer it to the blender. Simple as that. Then, you’ll need evaporated milk, which I like to use as a replacement for cream in some recipes. It’s thicker than regular milk and adds to the rich creaminess we’re trying to achieve with an Alfredo sauce. Honestly, evaporated milk should be used in more than just pumpkin pie.

Next, you’ll use a bit of vegetable stock, which will add a stock-like richness to the sauce without overpowering it. Then, some fresh lemon, salt, pepper, nutmeg and cayenne. I realize some of these ingredients are NOT traditional when it comes to Alfredo, but just go with it because without them, the flavor just isn’t there. And as for the lemon juice, you can add less or more depending on how lemony you want it. I personally love the extra hint of lemon in the sauce, but my husband doesn’t. So add a little at a time until it tastes just right. Not only does lemon provide that trademark flave, but it provides acid to the sauce, which is desperately needs since it’s so rich and creamy. It’s all about the balance.

Once you have the cauliflower mixture pureed into a smooth-as-silk sauce, set it aside while we bring in the big guns.

Add a little butter to a large skillet with a few tablespoons of olive oil. Grate several fresh garlic cloves into the pan and give them a saute for 30-60 seconds. This is when your kitchen will start to smell like HEAVEN. Once it’s super fragrant (but before the garlic burns), add the cauliflower puree. Whisk it all together with several handfuls of freshly grated Parmesan cheese until it’s nice and melty. Give it a taste and adjust the seasoning, if you wish.

And voila – you have magical creamy cauliflower alfredo.

Cauliflower alfredo sauce in white pot

What pasta should I pair the cauliflower alfredo with?

Next, you’ll want to pair cauliflower alfredo sauce with pasta. I’m a huge fan of fresh pasta when I can get my hands on it. Last time I made a grocery order, they happened to have fresh linguine, so I went for it, and was certainly not disappointed. With that said, I will never snub my nose at a box of dried pasta, either. Whether you go for fresh or dried, just be sure to cook it according to the package directions – al dente. That means when you grab a noodle out of the boiling water and toss it into your mouth, it should feel like it has a little bite to it, but isn’t hard or chewy. It also shouldn’t be done to the point of being mushy. Al dente = perfect.

As far as pasta shape, when it comes to alfredo, there really isn’t a wrong shape. But, I like to go for a long flat pasta like fettuccine or linguine. If you’re into the small tubular kind that traps some of the sauce within the noodle, like cavatappi, I will not shun you.

It’s also important to 1) boil a large pot of water (rather than trying to fit a box or bag of pasta in a tiny saucepan – it just doesn’t work) and 2) salt your pasta water, otherwise the pasta isn’t given a real chance to gain flavor. (Yes, the dietitian just told you to salt your pasta water.) The salt also helps the pasta from sticking together. Also make sure the water is at a full boil before adding the pasta. I avoid tossing the pasta in oil after cooking because the sauce then has a hard time adhering to the pasta and just slides right off. But, with that said, if your pasta is going to sit in the colander for a bit before being tossed with the sauce, it would benefit from a little oil so it doesn’t become a giant clump. It really is all about timing here.

Cauliflower alfredo sauce in white pot

What extras can I serve with this meal?

If you’re looking for a higher protein meal or just really enjoy meat and seafood, I highly suggest adding some chicken breast, a salmon filet or some shrimp or scallops to your pasta. All of these protein options LOVE pasta and alfredo, and can be prepared by roasting, broiling or sauteing. They only need to be dressed and cooked in olive oil, salt and pepper. Simple is a good thing, my friends.

What to do with leftovers and how else can I use cauliflower alfredo?

If you’re into it, go ahead and use the cauliflower Alfredo as pizza sauce. I did a rendition of this in my MIND diet cookbook on a Greek yogurt pizza crust with lots of veggies, and holy smokes is it dynamite. So, maybe make an extra batch and make homemade pizza this weekend? Just saying.

And last but not least, I have a few tips for reheating. One, it can last in the fridge about 5 days. Two, it can be reheated in the microwave or on the stove, and if the sauce thickens up too much, add a little stock or milk and maybe a splash of lemon juice to refreshen things up. And third, if you do pair it with protein, reheat them separately so they can both be reheated properly. You don’t want to zap the pasta beyond repair while trying to make sure your chicken is fully reheated, if you know what I mean.

Now, go ahead and enjoy a big bowl of the good stuff!

Print

Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce

Cauliflower alfredo sauce in white pot

Creamy cauliflower alfredo sauce made with fresh lemon, garlic, olive oil and Parmesan.

  • Author: Julie Andrews
  • Prep Time: 10-15 mins
  • Cook Time: 10-15 mins
  • Total Time: 20-30 mins
  • Yield: Serves 6 1x
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stove-Top
  • Cuisine: American
Scale

Ingredients

  • 9-ounces fresh fettuccine or linguine*
  • 3 cups cooked cauliflower florets
  • ½ cup evaporated milk
  • ¼ cup unsalted vegetable stock
  • Zest and juice of ½ medium lemon
  • 1 ¾ teaspoons kosher or sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Pinch freshly ground nutmeg
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup flat-leaf Italian parsley, chopped

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and set aside.
  2. Place cauliflower, milk, stock, lemon, salt, black pepper, nutmeg and cayenne pepper in a blender and puree until smooth.
  3. Heat the butter and olive oil in a large skillet to medium-low heat. Add the garlic and sauté 30-60 seconds or until fragrant. Pour the cauliflower puree into the skillet and bring to a simmer. Stir in the Parmesan cheese until melted. Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Add the cooked pasta and toss to coat.
  4. Serve in bowls and garnish with chopped parsley.

Notes

Substitution Tip: Use dried pasta instead of fresh. Use 2% milk instead of evaporated milk.

Cooking Tip: If the sauce thickens up when the pasta is reheated, add a bit of milk or vegetable stock to loosen it up.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/6 of recipe
  • Calories: 229
  • Sugar: 2g
  • Sodium: 412mg
  • Fat: 14g
  • Saturated Fat: 5g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 9g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 18g
  • Fiber: 2g
  • Protein: 7g
  • Cholesterol: 26mg

Keywords: alfredo, cauliflower, cauliflower alfredo, pasta, linguine, fettuccine, easy, healthy, lighter, simple

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2 thoughts on “Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce”

  1. I actually have lots of 1/2 & 1/2. Is there a way to substitute for evaporated milk if I don’t have any or does that change the consistency too much?

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